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Welcome to SEMCOG's Think Regional/Act Local blog! SEMCOG is the only organization in Southeast Michigan that brings together all governments to solve regional challenges and enhance the quality of life for the seven-county regions 4.7 million residents. With this regional perspective in mind, we work with member local governments to sustain our regions reputation as a great place to work, play, and do business.

 

Our panel of SEMCOG staff bloggers will post daily to this blog, discussing SEMCOG's data, federal and state legislative issues, and environmental and fiscal sustainability best practices for local governments all with the goal of creating a successful future for the region.

 

Meet SEMCOG's Blogging team:

Amy Mangus
Member Services
About Amy . . .
Read Amy's past posts

Dave Boerger
Government Efficiency
About Dave . . .
Read Dave's past posts

Bill Anderson
Local Government Revenue
About Bill . . .
Read Bill's past posts

Carmine Palombo
Transportation
About Carmine . . .
Read Carmine's past posts

Xuan Liu
Data & Demographics
About Xuan . . .
Read Xuan's past posts

Grant Brooks
Public Outreach
About Grant . . .
Read Grant's past posts

 

 

Think Regional/Act Local

The Power of Mother Nature

(Legislation, Regionalism, Stormwater management, Transportation) Permanent link

 

August 18, 2014 - Last Monday while driving home from a presentation in Birmingham, I saw something I have never seen before. There was so much water, creating so much pressure on the storm system that I saw a manhole cover literally explode out of the manhole! Incredible!

 

Monday was, indeed, an incredible day. I don't think I have ever seen so much rain in just a few hours. Each major piece of the public infrastructure system was taxed and pieces of each failed. The unprecedented rainfall severely impacted the road, storm and sewer, and electric systems, resulting in flooding in the streets and in many basements, as well as loss of electricity in some areas.

 

This situation was even worse on sections of the freeway, especially those below grade. Pumps are supposed to pump excess water out off the freeway, but many of the pumps either were overwhelmed by the volume of water or simply failed to work. Of course, I wonder where the pumps were supposed to pump the water to!

 

The result? Over 10 feet of water in some places. Water that covered several cars completely. By the way, the storm also knocked out electric service in several places which impacted the pumps on the freeway. I can't imagine having no electricity while watching water invade your basement. I feel so bad for so many people who had to endure that situation…and may still be.

 

The result? Cars totaled by their insurance companies, tons of bags of what used to be basement furniture, and personal things out on the street, people missing work to stay home and wait for help.

 

There have been several news stories about what happened and how we fix the situation. Mother Nature can display awesome power – power we cannot ever hope to totally mitigate. It is unreasonable to build an infrastructure system to address a storm of this size. A meteorologist said today that it was a once-every-500-years storm! However, it exposed the weakness in our public infrastructure system. We need to learn from this, prioritize improvements, and focus the resources we have on the most important improvements. We certainly need additional funding to improve the systems. We will never have the funds we need to fix everything, but we can make improvements over time.

 

It is our only chance to even begin to address the power of Mother Nature.

 

 

Carmine Palombo
If you want to know what about anything related to transportation in Southeast Michigan, don’t miss Carmine Palombo's blog. Carmine has more than 30 years of experience in various phases of transportation planning at SEMCOG. He is responsible for administering SEMCOG’s transportation planning program, which includes the region’s long-range transportation plan and short-term transportation plan.

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Be SMART

(Legislation, Public transportation, Regionalism) Permanent link

 

August 4, 2014 -Tuesday, August 5 is a very important day. It is primary election day. There are many important decisions we have to make as citizens. Besides narrowing down the field of candidates for the election in November, there are several service issues on the ballot. One of the more important ones is the SMART millage.

 

SMART provides transit service in Macomb County and in parts of Wayne and Oakland. It provides essential transportation service to thousands of people every day taking people to work, school, medical appointments, and the grocery store. SMART has been working with fewer dollars for several years now and has done a great job of lowering their operating costs and running a very efficient service.

 

The SMART millage is currently 0.59 mills and they are proposing to raise it to 1 mill. The additional dollars will allow them to buy new busses which will increase their reliability and lower their maintenance costs. SMART may even be able to restore some of the service they were forced to cut as a result of declining revenue.

 

There has been lots of talk about some of the new, sexy transit capital projects like the M-1 Streetcar and bus rapid transit. Everyone wants to talk about these projects and no one is excited about improving the bus network. I can tell you that these more expensive, capital transit projects will fail if the basic bus networks provided by SMART and DDOT do not provide reliable transit service. You have a chance on Tuesday to not only improve SMART and provide service to thousands of people, but also help to ensure the success of the higher-level transit to come.

 

The choice is yours. Please vote for better transit. Vote in support of the SMART millage on August 5.

 

 

Carmine Palombo
If you want to know what about anything related to transportation in Southeast Michigan, don’t miss Carmine Palombo's blog. Carmine has more than 30 years of experience in various phases of transportation planning at SEMCOG. He is responsible for administering SEMCOG’s transportation planning program, which includes the region’s long-range transportation plan and short-term transportation plan.

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