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Economic Development

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy focuses on increasing jobs and prosperity in Southeast Michigan

Increasing Jobs and Prosperity in Southeast Michigan provides a roadmap for the region’s economic vitality. The 2014 Update helps ensure we have a dynamic economic development strategy that is evolving to reflect the region’s current and future needs, which is important as we continue positioning ourselves to be successful in a globally competitive environment. Increasing Jobs and Prosperity in Southeast Michigan addresses our challenges and takes advantage of opportunities by focusing on our strengths and how we can distinguish Southeast Michigan from the competition through a cohesive, action-oriented plan. It builds upon, rather than duplicates, existing programs and includes 11 broad-based strategies and associated action steps that encompass the region’s human resources, business climate, and community assets – three important factors for attracting, retaining, expanding, and creating businesses and jobs.

Increasing Jobs and Prosperity in Southeast Michigan (PDF)

Living and Working in Southeast Michigan

Travel to work, showing the connections among business and the labor market, is one of the defining factors of a regional economy. Travel-to-work data in Southeast Michigan suggests that the SEMCOG region is connected by commuting flows that tie the housing markets and job centers across the region into one very strong, cohesive inter-reliant region. Using data from the Census Transportation Planning Package, Commuting Patterns in Southeast Michigan, an interactive mapping tool was developed to let you see where people in your community commute to and from. Just click on your community and explore.

Placemaking in Southeast Michigan

What defines a place? It’s the common ground where people gather – from housing, squares, streets, and plazas to parks, green spaces, and waterfronts. To revitalize Southeast Michigan, we must reconsider the types of places where New Economy workers, entrepreneurs, and businesses want to locate, invest, and expand. This approach is commonly described as creating a "sense of place" or just "placemaking."